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Chris Dixon      

Partner at Andreessen Horowitz, Co-Founder of Hunch & Co-Founder of Founders Collective

Chris Dixon is a General Partner at Andreesen Horowitz, a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm with $4.2 billion under management. The firm invests in entrepreneurs building companies at every stage – from seed to growth.

In addition, Dixon is Co-founder of Hunch, whose mission is to build a ‘taste graph’ of the entire web, connecting every person on the web with their affinity for anything, from books to electronic gadgets to fashion or vacation spots, providing better recommendations for everyone.

Chris is a personal investor in early technology companies, including Skype, Foursquare, Kickstarter, Canvas, Stack Overflow, TrialPay, DocVerse, Invite Media, ScanScout and a handful of other startups that are still in stealth mode.

He is Co-founder of Founder Collective (www.foundercollective.com) and Co-founder and CEO of SiteAdvisor, through its acquisition by McAfee. SiteAdvisor was awarded Time magazine’s “50 Coolest Websites” and PC World’s “100 Best Products of 2007” (#15).

Previously, Chris worked at Bessemer Venture Partners making early-stage investments, and has designed and programmed multimedia web applications. He has a BA and a MA in Philosophy from Columbia University, and a MBA from Harvard. Originally from Ohio, he now lives in New York City.

News


Confirmed: Chris Dixon Becomes Seventh Investing GP at

Chris Dixon will indeed be the latest VC to join Andreessen Horowitz, as I had reported earlier was likely, starting in January. Dixon is a lively and interesting ...

Chris Dixon sees big things for Bitcoin and yes, he has invested in it

Don't underestimate Bitcoin says Chris Dixon of Andreessen Horowitz. Dixon spoke at length about the digital currency Monday morning at TechCrunch Disrupt ...

Chris Dixon on competing with Internet giants for budding AI and VR talent

VC Chris Dixon of Andreessen Horowitz thinks it’s a lot harder to predict financial cycles than it is to see a new computing platform coming down the pike. As he noted in a recent post, new cycles tend to begin every 10 to 15 years; assuming the 2007 introduction of the iPhone kicked off the last wave, we’re fast heading toward the Next New Thing.

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