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Harry G. Broadman      

Authority and Seasoned Practitioner on Multinational Business Growth, Risk and Innovation; Private Equity Executive; Board Director; White House Trade and Investment Negotiator; World Bank Official; Harvard Faculty; RAND Corp.; Author; Business Columnist

Harry G. Broadman is a global authority on international finance, investment and trade; business growth, risk-mitigation and innovation strategy; and corporate governance.

One of the earliest serial entrepreneurs, he's re-invented himself more than a handful of times not only in an interdisciplinary fashion, but also across greatly differentiated senior roles in the private sector, interspersed with stints as a high-level policy maker.

Broadman has emerged as a genuine thought-leader on the unforeseen dynamics that have changed the underlying structure and character of world markets—long before the term "globalization" was commonplace.

These insights shaped his career focus on structuring cross-border transactions that propel a firm’s growth, especially in emerging markets, the parts of the world toward which Harry has always had a strong predisposition. These are where there is significant untapped potential for growth arising from increasing opportunities for arbitrage by exploiting misperceptions of risks and rewards.

Illustrative of this, he's worked on-the-ground with firms large and small as well as public and private, in more than 75 such countries across 5 continents. He's a driving force advising, creating, and establishing highly-successful enterprises positioned at the leading edge of their markets.

With an innate sense of how business functions, his professional journey has been propelled by intense personal inquisitiveness about the ways successful firms pierce through these misperceptions and grow rapidly, excel at remaining more competitive than rivals, reduce exposure to risks, and constantly innovate.

Broadman brings to audiences a unique combination of fundamentally insightful and pragmatic views about how commercial, financial and policy changes that drive international markets impact and alter today's businesses in ways few ever could have predicted. He has the rare ability to frame his speeches on the most salient business issues not only from a prospective rather than a simple rear-view mirror vantage point, but also expose the ways markets intrinsically tend to operate in non-linear patterns. Aside from leaving audiences with concrete takeaways, Broadman's speeches are entertaining and infused with his infectious sense of humor.

Broadman is currently CEO and Managing Partner of Proa Global Partners LLC, a global cross-border investment transaction strategy firm that provides operational, field-level advice on the design and execution of deals in emerging markets structured to provide for growth while also mitigating commercial and governance risks. Clients include corporations, banks, private equity firms, institutional investors, sovereign wealth funds and family offices and high net worth individuals.

Concurrently, Harry is a member of the Johns Hopkins University Faculty, where he serves as Director of Johns Hopkins' new Council on Global Enterprise and Emerging Markets as well as a Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins' Foreign Policy Institute. He is also a monthly columnist for Forbes, Newsweek International and Gulf News.

Broadman serves or has served on the Boards of Directors or Advisors of: ArmorText, an enterprise systems cyber security software provider; PartnersGlobal Institute, an international alternative dispute resolution firm; The Corporate Council on Africa; The Global Business School Network; The Russian-American Chamber of Commerce; and The Lake Tanganyika Floating Health Clinic. He is a Master Workshop Faculty Member of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD).

In 2015, Broadman stepped down as Senior Managing Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), where he founded and led PwC's Global Business Growth Strategy Management Consulting Practice, a transaction-centered business that worked with U.S. and non-U.S. Fortune 100 corporates, private equity firms and investment houses providing operational advice on structuring greenfield market entry, consummating mergers and acquisitions, forming public private partnerships (PPPs), managing global supply chains, plant location decision-making, and carrying out reputational due diligence.

Before joining PwC, he was Managing Director and a member of the Investment Committee at Albright Capital Management, a private equity and alternative strategy investment fund focused on emerging markets, co-chaired by Madeleine Albright. He was also Managing Director of The Albright Group (now Albright Stonebridge), a business diplomacy consultancy.

Earlier Harry was a senior official at the World Bank, where he oversaw the Bank’s largest operational and enterprise restructuring loans to China and Russia, and was Economic Advisor for the entire Africa Region

Before joining the Bank, he was Chief of Staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers in the White House during the first Gulf War and the Savings and Loan Crisis; United States Assistant Trade Representative, leading the U.S. negotiations on international trade and investment in the services sectors as part of the establishment of both NAFTA and the WTO, and where he also managed all negotiations of U.S. Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) with other sovereigns, sat on the Board of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) and served on the White House Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which assesses national security impacts of inbound investment; and served as Senior Professional Staff Member on U.S. Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, then chaired by John Glenn.

Prior to his government service, Harry was on the Harvard University faculty; staff member at the RAND Corporation; Assistant Director, Center for Energy Policy at Resources for the Future, Inc.; and fellow at the Brookings Institution.

He has authored several books and numerous professional articles published in a wide array of peer-reviewed economics, law, and foreign policy journals. His most recent books are: Africa's Silk Road: China and India's New Economic Frontier; From Disintegration to Reintegration: Russia and the Former Soviet Union in the Global Economy; and The State As Shareholder: China's Management of Enterprise Assets.

Harry is a lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of The Bretton Woods Committee. He received an A.B. in economics and history, Magna Cum Laude, from Brown University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and an A.M. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

For Contact Details, Videos, Press, Books, Articles, Columns: www.harrygbroadman.com

Speech Topics


Where Is the Growth in the World Economy?

The recent global financial crisis and the ongoing softness in much of the advanced countries—the EU, Japan and the U.S.—have shaken businesses’, investors’ and policymakers’ perceptions and confidence of a return to historic levels of stable growth. The fact that many emerging markets have been growing at annual rates two to three times those of the industrialized economies over the past two decades appears to confirm that the world marketplace is actually undergoing a structural transformation. What are the fundamental sources of these phenomena? Is this a one-time change, owning to a longer than normal business cycle that has yet to run its full course, or is it part of a long-term secular change? What new risks and opportunities are presented? Harry Broadman’s on-the-ground insights about the genesis and implications of these shifts—and his surprising bullish view—will alter how audiences think about the future of the U.S. and the world economies and will shape the decisions they make.

Why the Sudden Interest in Doing Business in Africa?

Over the past several years, interest in Africa as a destination for investment has been growing at a startling clip. A few niche private equity firms were the first to make serious inroads into the continent more than a decade ago. Now, a growing number of multinational corporations and the largest private equity firms, as well as a variety of other institutional investors, have “discovered” Africa. Still, too few business leaders and policymakers in the U.S., the EU and other advanced countries are aware that for the past two decades, much of sub-Saharan Africa has been enjoying a relatively uninterrupted period of robust growth, where, on average, there’s been an annual increase in gross domestic product (GDP) of more than five percent over those 20 years. Moreover, while most investors, economists and policymakers forecast that Africa would suffer the greatest economic damage from the recent global financial crisis, the exact opposite was the case: pound for pound, the continent proved to be the most resilient region of the world economy. What’s behind the excitement over Africa? Is it a real opportunity or just the investment du jour? How are investors coping with the risks? And how do those risks compare with other regions of the world? Given the vast size, the large number and the heterogeneity of the countries on the continent, how do businesses and investors determine which ones are the standouts and which ones to avoid? Having spent time in more than half of the number of African states, Harry Broadman speaks authoritatively about the prospects for Africa’s long-term growth, the use of innovative approaches for mitigating risks, and how to assess and capitalize on new market opportunities on the continent. Broadman reveals pivotal developments and trends taking place in a number of African countries that disrupt long-held views about doing business in the region.

Is China Really Destined To Be an Economic Powerhouse?

The conventional wisdom on Wall Street, inside the Capital Beltway, in the union hall and throughout the shopping mall is that it is inevitable that China will soon dominate the global economy. While at present, doubts are voiced due to the current slowdown in China’s output and the bubble in its real-estate sector, at the fundamental level those concerns are widely seen as temporary speed bumps in China’s inexorable march to be the world’s economic captain. A deeper understanding of the underlying structure and functioning of Chinese banks and enterprises, the framework governing policymaking in Beijing, the arc of the Communist Party’s stronghold over the economy, and the nexus of environmental, health and social challenges affords a different perspective. What are China’s real economic and policy risks? What role does the absence of democracy in the country play in China’s economic fortunes? How much has the Chinese economy in fact changed since the advent of reform in 1978? Where are there opportunities for China’s long-term growth? Harry Broadman, who has worked throughout China at the field level since 1993, will excite audiences with this fresh perspective on the trajectory of China’s economic destiny.

Managing Overseas Corruption Risks

Corruption is one of the most pervasive and pernicious risks facing corporations, banks, private equity funds and other investors in the international marketplace. Not only can corruption add sizeable costs to the bottom line and damage reputations and brand images for many years, it can also result in very serious criminal penalties, including imprisonment and very large fines. Despite the fact that an increasing number of governments have been either strengthening existing sanctions against corruption or establishing wholly new anti-corruption regimes, rarely, it seems, does a month go by without the appearance of a news headline about a firm being charged with involvement in corrupt activities. At the same time, businesses often complain about the fact that because their rivals are not being held to the same corruption standards, unfair competitive advantages are being created, or that anti-corruption authorities don’t understand that for some cultures, certain business practices are not deemed as corruption but as traditional ways to carry out commerce. Drawing on his considerable experience counseling businesses on structuring corruption de-risking strategies as well as advising governments on the design and execution of anti-corruption reform programs, Harry Broadman shares his insights on the “dos and don’ts” and best practice approaches to mitigating the risk of corruption in foreign markets. What are the various laws, regulations and enforcement institutions both at home and in key markets abroad most pertinent to corruption issues? What are the most effective strategies for combatting incipient corruption? What options are available to deal with competitors who are seemingly immune to corruption sanctions? How should a business’s compliance practices be designed and implemented? How can individuals or entities who are likely to present corruption vulnerabilities be systematically identified through due diligence at the very outset? What are the most effective responses to the discovery of corrupt activities? Which remedial steps are likely to have the largest payoffs? Broadman offers a window on the trends in the incidence of and responses to corruption in key foreign markets, e.g., China and Russia, and giving audiences the means to operate safely and successfully in the international arena.

Understanding U.S. Trade Policy: Past, Present and Future

To most Americans, negotiating and implementing international trade policy agreements is an enigma, which often breeds suspicion if not contempt for the process. Much is at stake for millions of U.S. businesses, workers and consumers. Demystifying the policymaking process, the institutions, the politics and the interrelationships among the stakeholders, both within the U.S. and our trading partners abroad, is essential to gain a better understanding of what are the benefits as well as the costs of various trade initiatives—past, present and prospective. With the overwhelming majority of the world’s customers located outside the U.S.—if not outside most advanced countries—trade is hardly only important to large businesses: small and medium-sized companies need to develop a strong understanding of international trade rules and opportunities in order to succeed in a global marketplace. How is trade policy actually developed in the U.S.? Who are the key parties that influence how those decisions are crafted? How likely will a change in presidential administration engender a shift in the stance of U.S. trade policy in such a way that there could be profound impacts on companies, workers and consumers—not just in the U.S. but also throughout the world? What are the indicators to look for when trying to determine which direction trade policy is headed—particularly with a change of administrations in 2017? A former senior-level trade negotiator in both the Bush (41) and Clinton White Houses, as well as a drafter of key trade legislation while a senior staff member in the Senate, Harry Broadman shares a ringside seat overview of the decision-making process in Washington behind recent trade policy initiatives, including the negotiation of NAFTA and the WTO. He also highlights the trade challenges of the future, with respect to China and other major trading powers, and offers his insights on effective ways to take advantage (and avoid the pitfalls) of trade agreements as businesses operate abroad.

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