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Arne Duncan        

Managing Partner, Emerson Collective; Former U.S. Secretary of Education (2009 - 2015)

Arne Duncan was the ninth U.S. Secretary of Education. Duncan served under President Barack Obama from January 20, 2009 through January 1, 2016.

As managing partner at Emerson Collective, former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan returns to Chicago on a mission to improve the lives of young adults in his hometown. Through partnerships with local business leaders, community organizers, and nonprofit groups, Duncan aims to create job and life opportunities for disconnected youth between the ages of 17 and 24.

Emerson Collective is an organization dedicated to removing barriers to opportunity so people can live to their full potential. Established by Laurene Powell Jobs, Emerson Collective centers its work on education, immigration reform, the environment and other social justice initiatives.

Prior to joining the Obama Administration, Duncan served as chief executive officer of Chicago Public Schools. From 2001 to 2008, Duncan won praise for uniting the city’s stakeholders behind an education agenda that included opening 100 new schools; expanding after-school, summer learning, early childhood, and college access programs; dramatically boosting the caliber of teachers; and building public-private partnerships around a variety of education initiatives.

Duncan graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1987, majoring in sociology. At Harvard he served as co-captain of the basketball team and was named a first team Academic All-American.

Duncan is married to Karen Duncan, and they have two children.

News


Education Secretary Arne Duncan stepping down - CNNPolitics.com

(CNN) President Barack Obama praised Arne Duncan's service as secretary of education on Friday, hours after Duncan said he would step down in December.

Obama Wants To Get Rich And Poor Kids In The Same Classroom

After years of inaction on the issue, the Obama administration is taking new steps to help schools achieve socioeconomic diversity.

Included in the president's proposed 2017 budget is a $120 million competitive grant program to help districts devise and implement plans to get rich and poor children in the same classrooms. The initiative -- called Stronger Together -- provides funds for five-year projects to districts and groups of districts. The projects should allow schools to explore "ways to foster socioeconomic diversity through a robust process of parental, educator and community engagement, and data analysis," the proposed budget says.

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