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Thousand Foot Krutch    

Toronto-area Christian rockers.

Toronto-area Christian rockers Thousand Foot Krutch first appeared in 1997, when Trevor McNevan, Joel Bruyere, and Steve Augustine started putting a worship song spin on a rap-metal sound similar to Limp Bizkit or Korn. After building a buzz around Ontario with numerous shows, a strong demo, and thriving trade of MP3s through its website, Thousand Foot Krutch signed with Diamante and issued Set It Off, its official debut, in March 2001. The album featured a rap-rockified version of EMF's "Unbelievable," tricked out with a Christian-themed rap from McNevan. TFK jumped to the much higher profile Tooth & Nail for September 2003's Phenomenon. They'd grown up considerably in the two years since Set It Off, and the new album reflected a more focused, rocking sound. The trio joined Kutless and FM Static for a late-2003/early-2004 tour. ~ Johnny Loftus, All Music Guide

Sometimes the best way to move forward is to go back to the basics, taking all of the raw energy and emotion of the past and channeling it into the present, coupled with all of the progression and knowledge obtained in the intermediary years. And that’s exactly what Thousand Foot Krutch is doing on the aptly titled The End Is Where We Begin, which doesn’t just showcase the group’s thunderous musical pursuits coming full circle with its most cutting edge album to date, but also finds Canada’s favorite modern rockers voluntarily walking away from record label life altogether (even after a slew of profitable offers came along) to reignite the passionate DIY work ethos that first emerged over a decade ago.

“The End Is Where We Begin summarizes everything we’ve been through as a band, and where we are now- the closing of one chapter and the beginning of another,” confides front man Trevor McNevan. “We’ve been through every transition you could face as a band in the past year, aside from the band line up, and our entire team couldn’t be more excited. Against all odds, not to mention some pretty lucrative record contracts, we’re following what we feel is the right thing for us to do, and at the end of the day, that’s our responsibility. We’re very thankful to have the support and trust we do with our audience; they’re as much a part of our team, as anyone else. We’re growing together, and look forward to each new step we take together.”

For those who’ve been following the Ontario-bred players since their formation in 1998, it’s been a continuously escalating highlight reel that includes best-selling albums, four top 25 Active Rock hits (including the top 20 smash “Fire It Up”), plus a slew of soundtrack slots. In fact, the group has literally infiltrated every facet of pop culture, from ongoing ESPN appearnces, to various NASCAR, MLB, NHL and NFL airings (including the 2010 Super Bowl), along with the “GI Joe” movie trailer, WGN-TV’s “Smallville” and EA Sports’ “NHL 2010” video game.

That trend is continuing at breakneck speed with the new project, which even prior to hitting streets, found the lead single “Let The Sparks Fly” and fellow adrenaline-infused rocker “Light Up the Sky” picked up by ESPN. Both tracks also serve as the ultimate tone setters for the sonic explosions contained within The End Is Where We Begin, which could be considered the ultimate Thousand Foot Krutch mix-tape showcasing a myriad of full-throttled personalities.

“If I had to use one word to describe the sound of this record, I would say ‘uninhibited,’” ponders McNevan. “From the beginning, the architecture of this record was different from the others. I knew this one was something special when I felt the need to go back- back to just sitting on the bed with a guitar with no outside voices- and being inspired by just the simple possibilities. The past songs and records have always been honest- that’s something very true to our hearts as musicians and always will be- but this was something different. There’s something that happens when you turn the sound down and just listen. I’ll never forget those moments.”

Throughout that period of simplifying and waiting for inspiration to arrive, McNevan popped in the band’s very first project, That’s What People Do, which echoed respected rappers like Run-DMC and the Beastie Boys, cross-pollinated with the rhythmic grooves of Red Hot Chili Peppers. Those inspirations return throughout The End Is Where We Begin, alongside the group’s continuously marinating blend of towering choruses, razor-sharp rhythms, epic arrangements and stadium shaking rumbles.

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